Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge? an economic perspective by Matthew J. Kotchen

Cover of: Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge? | Matthew J. Kotchen

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Petroleum -- Alaska -- Mathematical models,
  • Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska) -- Economic aspects,
  • Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska) -- Environmental aspects

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementMatthew J. Kotchen, Nicholas E. Burger.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 13211., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 13211.
ContributionsBurger, Nicholas E., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination23 p. :
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17634579M
OCLC/WorldCa156946460

Download Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge?

Should We Drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. An Economic Perspective Matthew J. Kotchen, Nicholas E. Burger.

NBER Working Paper No. Issued in July NBER Program(s):Environment and Energy Economics, Public Economics. This paper provides model-based estimates of the value of oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). It's no wonder that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is called the crown jewel of our refuge system.

The Arctic Refuge is the only refuge where you’ll find the spectacle of polar bears denning and massive migrations of caribou thundering through the land each year.

Why Drilling Shouldn’t be Allow in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge In my opinion drilling shouldn't be Allow in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge because it is more of an environmental issue. Due to the fact that oil and gas exploration and development in the (ANWR).

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Battle Ends, But Drilling Not A Given After nearly 40 years of heated debate, Congress voted on Wednesday to open the Alaska refuge to oil drilling. Now, it's a.

For $ million, taxpayers should be getting a serious assessment of the dangers and damage that will be done by drilling the Arctic refuge, not a kangaroo court.” Companies take first step to. The Arctic refuge, or ANWR as it is often called, is a million-acre section of northeastern Alaska that is considered one of the most pristine areas in the United States.

debates has been the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), an area which encompasses 19 million acres in the northeast corner of Alaska.

The ANWR issue is now a political hot potato batted back. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, or ANWR, is a refuge geared toward preserving national wildlife in northeastern Alaska.

ANWR is about 19 million acres, in space, and contains a potential drilling spot for oil and petroleum. The potential drilling spot is a small area known as the Area. It is only million acres, or 8%, of ANWR, would even be considered for development (What is ANWR).

Energy Policy 35 () – Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. An economic perspective Matthew J. Kotchena,b,c, Nicholas E. Burgera,b aBren School of Environmental Science & Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, CAUSA bDepartment of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA cNational Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, File Size: KB.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is America's largest and wildest piece of publicly owned land. Polar bears, caribou, and wolves roam its. Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge? book of us are aware of the great debate over drilling for oil in ANWR, or the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska.

President Bush promoted the idea, indeed he campaign on it. The Democrats, and some Republicans including Senator McCain, opposed it. In addition, we examine the benefits and costs of allowing drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the areas of the Outer Continental Shelf that were until recently closed to drilling.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is home to a great diversity of wildlife – one reason environmentalists oppose oil and gas drilling. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, CC BY-SAAuthor: Scott L. Montgomery. Should the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge be opened to oil drilling.

This paper will debate whether or not we should allow Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to be opened to oil drilling. This will also show the impact it has on the environment, and I will show a critical analysis of the current issue of whether or not to drill.

Abstract. This paper provides model-based estimates of the value of oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The best estimate of economically recoverable oil in the federal portion of ANWR is billion barrels of oil, a quantity roughly equal to US consumption in Cited by: There could be a lot of oil Estimates are that there is a large amount of oil in ANWR.

The area that is specifically looked at for oil development is the northern most part of ANWR and is referred to as the Coastal area of ANWR is only about 8% of the refuge. The value of preserving this land has long been recognized by Americans.

Back inthe Arctic National Wildlife Range was established under President Dwight Eisenhower. The original range was later renamed the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and enlarged in under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA).

To drill or not to drill. That has long been the question in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The rising price of oil, terrorism, turbulence in the Persian Gulf, and recent acts of Congress have put ANWR on the political agenda once again.

Oil prices have more than doubled in Cited by: Negative effects on the environment This refuge is one of the most fragile ecosystems and major disturbances can have long lasting impacts.

The harsh climate and short growing season does not allow species time to recover from those disturbances. The Coastal Plain, where the oil drilling is proposed to take place is considered the "biological. Get this from a library. Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge?: an economic perspective.

[Matthew J Kotchen; Nicholas E Burger; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- This paper provides model-based estimates of the value of oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR).

The best estimate of economically recoverable oil in the federal portion of ANWR is. When it comes to oil and gas exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), the decades-long debate has always centered around the question” “Should we drill?” As mayor of Alaska’s North Slope Borough, which includes ANWR, I propose that a more appropriate question is: “Why haven’t we drilled yet?” A fragile economyAuthor: Harry K.

Brower, Jr. JOHN GIBSON, HOST: President Bush promoting the cornerstone of his energy plan: drilling for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

The president's proposal would affect 2, acres. The Artic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) consists of 19, acres in the Alaska North Slope region. It is the largest National Wildlife Refuge in the nation, and supports the largest variety of plant and animal life in the Artic Circle ranging from polar bears to foxes to ducks.

America Does NOT Need to Drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Thesis: If the United States is going to choose to conserve energy responsibly, then our government's energies should not be focused on developing oil in the ANWR, but rather on the topics of conservation through higher fuel efficiency standards in vehicles and by developing.

Downloadable (with restrictions). This paper provides model-based estimates of the value of oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The best estimate of economically recoverable oil in the federal portion of ANWR is billion barrels of oil, a quantity roughly equal to US consumption in The oil is worth $ billion ($), but would cost $ billion to extract and.

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Should Be Protected From Oil Drilling Words | 4 Pages. Assignment Subject Point of Significance Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Should be protected from oil drilling Dear President Barack Obama: As you may be aware, some of your Congressmen are wanting to drill for oil at the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR).

The tax bill headed to President Trump for signature lifts a ban on oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. But it might take years for drilling to begin, if it ever does. In late August, we’re waiting for the herd of someanimals to leave their summer birthing grounds in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and head southeast, where they Author: Bathsheba Demuth.

Arctic Son Lesson Plan 1 Lesson Plan: Debate – Should Oil Drilling Be Allowed in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. OVERVIEW: This lesson plan is designed to be used in conjunction with the film Arctic Son, which captures the lifestyle of Native people (the Vuntut Gwitchin) living above the Arctic CircleFile Size: 38KB.

The Trump administration will soon let oil companies bid on land to drill in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Some Alaska Natives fear harm to migrating caribou, others see opportunity.

The Trump administration is barreling ahead with plans to drill for oil in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the largest refuge in the country and an area of global ecological importance.

Many refer to the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge — the very place where Author: Samantha Borek. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provides general information on the wildlife that live in the ANWR, natural land features, history of the refuge, Native cultures and more.

Help Save the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge This site provides information in opposition to drilling for oil in the Arctic. These satellite images of a small part of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge show the site of what, so far, is the only oil well ever drilled in the refuge, an exploratory well known as KIC On their way through the Brooks Range, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, thecaribou in the Porcupine herd crowd into a narrow valley, and a few end up in Lake Peters.

: Should Drilling Be Permitted In The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (At Issue Series) (): Haugen, David M.: BooksFormat: Paperback. I had never heard of the million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge before, but as a fan of cold and remote places, I picked the book up and thumbed through its glossy pages.

The images of faraway glaciers, unnamed lakes, neon northern lights and shaggy caribou transported me, for the moment, away from the numerous white tablecloths and plentiful people milling about the room. A grizzly bear prowls the tundra of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Oct.

9, (AP Photo/David Foster) (RNS) — Being chased by a grizzly bear was not something I intended for my bucket list, but a trip to the wilds of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge changed that for me.

Downloadable. This paper provides model-based estimates of the value of oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The best estimate of economically recoverable oil in the federal portion of ANWR is billion barrels of oil, a quantity roughly equal to US consumption in The oil is worth $ billion ($), but would cost $ billion to extract and bring to market.

The Arctic National Wildlife refuge is one of the last intact landscapes in America, and home to 37 species of land mammals, 8 marine mammals, 42 fish species, and more than migratory bird species.

President Bush once said that America is addicted to oil. The same is true for other countries. While we do not seek out alternative resources, our addiction and need is ever-present. This book. Three recent polls on the public's reaction to possible oil drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge found conflicting results.

The public either supports oil drilling by up to a point margin, or opposes such drilling by an identical point margin. While all three polls provide some insights into what the public is thinking, no one poll definitively reflects public opinion on. or not drilling in the ANWR should be allowed, it is helpful to first learn more about the Refuge's history.

II. THE HISTORY OF ALASKA AND THE ANWR A. Brief History of Alaska The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge lies on the Arctic coastline at Alaska's northern slope In Cited by: 2. Y ears ago, camping in Alaska’s Arctic national wildlife refuge, I watched a herd of caribou –bulls, cows and their three-week-old calves – braid over the tundra, moving to a rhythm Author: Kim Heacox.During the debate on whether or not to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), the U.S.

Department of the Interior has posted Website pictures of the actual area where oil would be drilled--and those pictures conclusively demonstrate that the pictures of mountains and abundant wildlife shown on television news broadcasts are misleading at best and dishonest at worst.

76646 views Friday, November 13, 2020